Year

1988

DOI

10.17848/9780880995344

Abstract

After summarizing the theoretical arguments for and against plant closing legislation, the authors present results of empirical analyses, based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Displaced Workers and other data sources, that show that having advance notice appears to reduce the probability that a displaced worker will suffer any spell of unemployment.

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Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Do Advance Notice Provisions Matter?
  3. Data Used in Our Analyses
  4. The Determinants of Advance Notice: Do Workers Pay For It?
  5. Advance Notice and Nonemployment Duration
  6. Advance Notice and Survey Date Employment and Earnings
  7. Implications of Findings

Note

Findings discussed in seminars at Cornell University, the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Upjohn Institute and in a paper presented at the American Economic Association meeting, December 1987

Sponsorship

Grants from the National Science Foundation Economics Program and the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research

ISBN

9780880990707 (pbk) ; 9780880995344 (ebook)

Subject Areas

LABOR MARKET ISSUES; Job security and unemployment dynamics; Dislocated workers

Advance Notice Provisions in Plant Closing Legislation

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Citation

Ehrenberg, Ronald G., and George H. Jakubson. 1988. Advance Notice Provisions in Plant Closing Legislation. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. https://doi.org/10.17848/9780880995344

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