Year

2012

Series

Upjohn Institute Technical Report No. 12-027

DOI

10.17848/tr12-027

Abstract

Labor force participation is a key social indicator because the economic performance of a state and the well-being of its residents are closely tied to labor force outcomes. Together, the labor force participation rate (LFPR) and the unemployment rate are of paramount concern to state governments because living standards and consumption are so closely tied to work and earnings from employment.
Mississippi has historically had one of the lowest LFPRs in the United States.
The purpose of this report is threefold:
• to describe the LFPR gap between Mississippi and other Southern states during the last 35 years
• to describe key differences between Mississippi and other Southern states — such as place of residence, educational attainment, racial composition, and receipt of government transfers — that might contribute to the LFPR gap between Mississippi and other Southern states
• to analyze and draw conclusions about the reasons for the LFPR gap between Mississippi and other Southern states

Issue Date

March 2012

Note

Authors assisted by Jing Cai, Francesca Fazio, and Brian Pittelko

Sponsorship

The Mississippi Governor's Office

Subject Areas

LABOR MARKET ISSUES

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Citation

Lachowska, Marta, and Stephen A. Woodbury with the assistance of Jing Cai, Francesca Fazio, Brian Pittelko. 2012. "Labor Force Participation in Mississippi and other Southern States: Final Report." Upjohn Institute Technical Report No. 12-027 Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. http://dx.doi.org/10.17848/tr12-027