Year

1996

Series

Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 96-44

**Published Version**

Advisory Council on Unemployment Compensation: Background Papers. Washington, D.C.: The Council, 1995-1996, v.3, p. [KK1]-KK37

DOI

10.17848/wp96-44

Abstract

We translate the results of the three reemployment bonus experiments that were conducted during the 1980s into (a) impacts of a 10-percentage point increase in the Unemployment Insurance (UI) replacement rate on the expected duration of unemployment; and (b) impacts of adding 1 week to the potential duration of UI benefits on the expected duration of unemployment. Our approach is to use an equilibrium search and matching model, calibrated using data from the bonus experiments and secondary sources. The results suggest that a 10-percentage point increase in the UI replacement rate increases the expected duration of unemployment by .3 to 1.1 week (a range consistent with, but only somewhat narrower than, the existing range of estimates), and that adding 1 week to the potential duration of UI benefits increases the expected duration of unemployment by .05 to .2 week (which is toward the low end of existing estimates).

Issue Date

April 1996

Subject Areas

UNEMPLOYMENT, DISABILITY, and INCOME SUPPORT PROGRAMS; Unemployment insurance; Benefits and duration; WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT; Labor exchange

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Citation

Davidson, Carl, and Stephen A. Woodbury. 1996. "Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment: Implications of the Reemployment Bonus Experiments." Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 96-44. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. https://doi.org/10.17848/wp96-44