Labor Unions and the Economic Performance of Firms

Title

Labor Unions and the Economic Performance of Firms

Year

1991

DOI

10.17848/9780585283005

Abstract

Hirsch develops a model of union rent-seeking in which the unions capture a share of quasi-rents that make up the normal ROI in long-lived capital and R&D. He finds that in response, firms adjust their investments in vulnerable tangible and intangible capital. Hirsch also attempts to explain the connection between the contraction of the size of unions which occurred in the 1970s and firms' lower profitability, diminished market value, and lower investment levels.

Files

Download 1. Introduction (459 KB)

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Union Rent-Seeking and the Economic Performance of Firms
  3. Union Coverage Among U.S. Firms
  4. Labor Unions and Firm Profitability
  5. Labor Unions and Firm Investment Behavior
  6. Labor Unions, Productivity, and Productivity Growth
  7. Summary and Evaluation

ISBN

9780880991100 (pbk.) ; 9780585283005 (ebook)

Subject Areas

LABOR MARKET ISSUES; Employment relationships; Unions and collective bargaining

Labor Unions and the Economic Performance of Firms

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Citation

Hirsch, Barry T. 1991. Labor Unions and the Economic Performance of Firms. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. https://doi.org/10.17848/9780585283005