Publication Date

7-5-2022

Series

Upjohn Institute working paper ; 22-367

DOI

10.17848/wp22-367

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of the First Great Migration on children. We use the complete-count 1940 Census to estimate selection-corrected place effects on education for children of Black migrants. On average, Black children gained 0.8 years of schooling (12 percent) by moving from the South to the North. Many counties that had the strongest positive impacts on children during the 1940s offer relatively poor opportunities for Black youth today. Opportunities for Black children were greater in places with more schooling investment, stronger labor market opportunities for Black adults, more social capital, and less crime.

Issue Date

June 2022

Subject Areas

EDUCATION; K-12 Education; LABOR MARKET ISSUES

Share

Get in touch with the expert

Want to arrange to discuss this work with the author(s)? Contact our .

COinS
 

Citation

Baran, Cavit, Eric Chyn, and Bryan A. Stuart. 2022. "The Great Migration and Educational Opportunity." Upjohn Institute Working Paper 22-367. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. https://doi.org/10.17848/wp22-367